Things at our house are beginning to look a little bit like Christmas! Not a lot yet, because I’m not one for getting out the Christmas decorations until AFTER Thanksgiving.

There are a few Christmasy smells around here though and some sparkles and swirls, because now is the time I’ve been busy making some Christmas soaps, lotions, and bath salts.

Today I will share with you the making of my Holiday Spice soap, it is delectable!

I make my soaps with palm oil, coconut oil, shea butter and olive oil, for their excellent moisturizing and lathering capabilities. I start with clean sanitized utensils, and my trusty kitchen scale. Everything has to be measured out accurately.

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This is very important, because if the measurements aren’t accurate, your soap will not turn out. It could be too harsh, or too soft and not set up, among other disasters…. yeah, lets not go there, lol!

When you have all of your ingredients out, your lye, oils, scents and other fun things you want to add, and everything is measured, the first thing you need to do is melt your solid oils.

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While these are melting on low on your stove, you will make your lye solution. Lye, or Sodium Hydroxide is very caustic. It can cause burns and lung damage if breathed in. That’s why I open the window, and mix it with my distilled water on the kitchen window ledge. That way the fumes go outside.

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Always mix in stainless steel or plastic containers because it will ruin other metals.

You should wear rubber gloves for this part, but if any splashes on you, vinegar will stop the burn. Always have a bottle of vinegar near by.

After the hard oils have melted, I add my olive oil, and pour the oils into my plastic soap bucket. AKA ice cream pail.Now there is a waiting game, the oils and lye solution have to both be from 90 to 110 degrees. I use a kitchen thermometer designated for this purpose.

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When to oils and lye solution become close to the same temp, you can slowly and carefully pour your lye solution into your oils.

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An important tool to have for this project is a stick blender.

This will help your soap get done much faster, unless you don’t mind stirring for hours on end. With the stick blender it can take only 5 to 10 minutes.

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As you can see, your soap becomes an opaque color almost immediately. Using the blender, stir until you reach a thin pudding like consistency, and you can see the faint lines of soap on top as you drizzle it from your blender. Hopefully you can see this in the picture…

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This is called trace, as you can see traces of it on top of the mixture. Notice it has become a lighter color as well. Now is the time you add your essential oils, and cinnamon powder in this case.

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I have mixed sweet orange, cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove oils in this bottle.

I also sprinkle in a bit of cinnamon for looks, and texture.  Once your additions have been thoroughly mixed in, you can pour. Sometimes cinnamon oil can make to soap become thick very fast, so be aware of this, and move quickly.

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Once your soap is in the mold, you can do designs or add cute little finishing touches. Here I have added a dried orange slice and cinnamon stick. I use a silicone loaf pan, with something heavy beside it to keep the pan from bowing out.

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The last step is to cover it, I use an old roaster cover and a blanket on top of that. The reason being, it needs to be insulated so it can saponify, or turn into soap. If too cold it wont happen. You have to put it to bed, so to speak.

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Now doesn’t that look just cozy?  I think I need a blankie too!

Leaving it for 24 hours, you can then unwrap,  unmold, and slice into about 10 or 11 slices. Here is the final result, and it smells awesome!

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It makes a fun, festive gift for friends and                               family, 

and its luxurious, and good for your skin. No chemicals or funny sounding ingredients. After saponification takes place there is no lye in your finished soap. You should however let it cure for at least four weeks, this is why I started my Christmas soaps the beginning of November!

So yes, it is beginning to look (and smell) a little like Christmas around here, and getting more so all the time!